Tim Burton’s “Big Eyes” and the Torture of Dishonesty

There is a superficial idea championed by some movies that dishonesty sells.  Heist films like Hell or High Water or Ocean’s Eleven suggest that a caper can handsomely reward the protagonist, if it’s properly executed.  White lies can tell a person, “exactly what they need to hear” as a plot contrivance for furthering a character’s confidence, like Neo in The Matrix.  And even films that deride dishonesty often do so by showcasing the extreme fall that accompanies an ill-gotten rise, even though the character doesn’t necessarily need to consider their lies to be a transgression at all;  think The Wolf of Wall Street, Catch Me if You Can, or other examples of hubris-infused justice.  Rare is the film that showcases the psychological destruction that a lie can wreak on a person’s life.  Tim Burton’s Big Eyes is a fascinating exploration of precisely that idea.

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The “Windbound” Documentaries: Films about Films that Don’t Get Made

One attractive quality of documentaries is that you can seek out the films on subjects that interest you.  This being Plot and Theme, a blog on film, I am often drawn to documentaries about film making.  Many different aspects of film making interest me, but a subgenre has emerged in force over the last few years:  the stories of films that fail to get made.  Documentaries focusing on the strife behind camera have existed for decades, perhaps most notably in Hearts of Darkness:  A Filmmaker’s Apocalypse (1991), which details the struggles behind the making of Apocalypse Now.  Similar docs portray the difficulty in making such films as Citizen Kane, Fitzcarraldo, and even The Boondocks Saints.  But, at the end of the days, these films all got made according to the director’s vision, however compromised.  The documentaries I am interested in showcase a different kind of film:  ones that don’t make it to completion whatsoever.

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