Jon Favreau’s “The Jungle Book” Enhances the Animation, Plot, and Theme of the 1967 Original

Though Disney’s live-action adaptations of their traditional animated stories have been a mixed bag so far, Jon Favreau and company have delivered a surprising gem in The Jungle Book.  Like other adaptations, this film is certainly a re-make of the original and contains many of the same thematic elements, but some unique nuances add a great deal to the overall quality of the film.  Though the movie is not without its faults, it is vastly superior to the animated version from 1967 in almost every way:  it has a stronger sense of character development, a more coherent plot-theme, and even sports higher-quality animation.  This is hands-down the best of Disney’s recent live-action adaptations.

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The First Official Trailer for Jon Favreau’s “The Jungle Book” Keeps a Familiar Story Mysterious

One of the biggest surprises of Disney’s D23 convention was the trailer for Jon Favreau’s live-action adaptation of The Jungle Book. Finally, we get to see the official trailer for this film, which is essentially what everyone at D23 already saw (though the trailer shown there was slightly different, based on descriptions from people who saw it at D23). Pay close attention to the tone of this trailer, and especially the multiple fades to black, as it makes the film look far darker than the familiar animated feature from the late ‘60s:

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Classic Review Friday – Sofia Coppola’s “Lost in Translation” (2003)

A sensual ennui permeates Sofia Coppola’s Lost in Translation, imploring spectators from young adulthood through old age to respond to the budding relationship between Bob Harris (Bill Murray) and Charlotte (Scarlett Johansson) as the two navigate a foreign language, city, and feelings. At its heart, this is a film about confronting your insecurities and reveling in the warm feeling of a new romance and friendship. The hustling, neon beehive of Tokyo acts as the perfect setting for such a story, as the hyperactive assault on the senses that we see on the surface belies the quiet torture of that directionless feeling.

Continue reading “Classic Review Friday – Sofia Coppola’s “Lost in Translation” (2003)”

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