“Free Fire” Attempts Farce, Ends Up Boring and Haphazard

In a strange paradox, executing a proper farce demands preternatural planning.  Stray but a little from the knife’s edge, and the tone can spiral out of control as the conflicting elements of the film separate like a broken sauce.  Ben Wheatley’s Free Fire suffers such a fate, though it isn’t for lack of effort or a gripping central idea.  The film tries to position some idiosyncratic characters in a bottle, shake everything up, and let them shoot guns at each other for 75 minutes, but too many of these elements are just a bit off the mark.  The characters and the performances mostly hit, and the inciting event feels reasonable, but the organization and the length of the fight strains comprehension and ends up being to repetitive to hold the spectator’s interest.  Free Fire does a better job than most genre-bending farces, but ultimately it just feels too boring for a movie centered around a free-for-all firefight.

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Trailer Hype: “Free Fire” and “Baby Driver” Boast Peculiar Aesthetic Gimmicks

I’ve got a pair of sweet trailers here, and they both look like high-octane, shoot-em-up action flicks, though they have wildly different tones.  Free Fire is going to be the first to hit theaters, and features an insane collection of talent along with a humorous concept.  Baby Driver is similarly stocked, and an Edgar Wright film is always worth checking out – especially given the recent hype coming out of the South-by-Southwest (SXSW) Film Festival.  Fortunately, we’ve got some trailers to hype us up.

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“Sing Street” Leverages its Exceptional Music to Craft a Superlative Coming-of-Age Story

Leaning heavily on his music video roots, John Carney has concocted a captivating coming-of-age story in Sing Street.  Though populated by a cadre of lesser-known actors, there are solid performances all around, and absolutely wonderful musical pieces.  It is tangentially reminiscent of a small-scope Almost Famous, complete with a young man exploring the world of music, but in this case it is as a creator and not as a journalist.  Further, Sing Street is much more family-life focused, and there is a decided follow-your-dreams lean to the theme of the film.  But the undoubted strength of the film is its employment of music.  Carney uses music for everything:  characterization, relationship-building, thematic statements, and much, much more.  Plus, the pieces are drop-dead fantastic, and the majority of the score is diegetic, which aids the realism of the film.  Taken together, it is clear that Sing Street will contend with the very best films of 2016.

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